Population Health Research Brief Series

Preventing Heat-Related Fatalities during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Danielle Rhubart
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Key Findings:

  • COVID-19 physical distancing creates challenges for preventing heat-related deaths this summer.
  • Adults age 65 and older experienced the highest risk of heat-related death.
  • Heat-related death rates are highest in the most urban and rural areas of the U.S.
  • State and local governments must develop age- and place-appropriate interventions to prevent heat-related deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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New York State’s Rural Counties Have Higher COVID-19 Mortality Risk

Shannon M Monnat and Yue Sun
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Although New York State’s rural counties have experienced lower rates of COVID-19 infection and mortality thus far than their urban counterparts (thanks in large part to their lower population density), several of NY’s rural counties are at risk of high COVID-19 fatality rates should infections start to spread.

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Black Lives Matter: Police Brutality in the Era of COVID-19

Tyra Jean
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As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to shock the globe and disproportionately affect Black communities, an additional long-running U.S. epidemic has rapidly gained domestic and global awareness: disproportionate police brutality against the Black community. Being killed by the police is a leading cause of death for Black men in America.1 Blacks are 3.5 times more likely than Whites to be killed by a police officer in the U.S.2

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Workers with Disabilities May Remain Unemployed Long after the COVID-19 Pandemic

Jennifer D. Brooks
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While the re-opening of the U.S. economy promises a return to work for some, this may not be the case for many displaced workers with disabilities. Workers with disabilities are often the first fired and last hired.1 The COVID-19 labor market is no exception to this rule. Recently released data suggest that employment rates between March and April 2020 decreased 18% for the general population, but 24% for workers with disabilities.2 While the “new normal” of virtual work has created more inclusive and flexible online work environments,3 people with disabilities are losing, instead of gaining, traction in the labor market. But, why? 

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