Population Health Research Brief Series

Preventing Heat-Related Fatalities during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Danielle Rhubart
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Key Findings:

  • COVID-19 physical distancing creates challenges for preventing heat-related deaths this summer.
  • Adults age 65 and older experienced the highest risk of heat-related death.
  • Heat-related death rates are highest in the most urban and rural areas of the U.S.
  • State and local governments must develop age- and place-appropriate interventions to prevent heat-related deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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New York State’s Rural Counties Have Higher COVID-19 Mortality Risk

Shannon M Monnat and Yue Sun
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Although New York State’s rural counties have experienced lower rates of COVID-19 infection and mortality thus far than their urban counterparts (thanks in large part to their lower population density), several of NY’s rural counties are at risk of high COVID-19 fatality rates should infections start to spread.

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Lerner Research Affiliate Dessa Bergen-Cico publishes article in US News: Self-Care for Social Reengagement in the Era of COVID-19

In this US News article, Self-Care for Social Reengagement in the Era of COVID-19, Bergen-Cico writes how reengaging with media and society can feel overwhelming after self-isolating during the pandemic. She suggests that compassion and patience are key as society emerges from coronavirus-induced isolation.

Also read her issue brief: Breaking Isolation: Self Care for When Coronavirus Quarantine Ends.

Lerner Graduate Research Affiliate Kent Cheng published an article entitled: “Influenza-Associated Excess Mortality in the Philippines, 2016-2015” in the journal PLOS ONE.

Cheng and his coauthors find that influenza deaths are dramatically under-counted in Philippines’ national data. About
5,350 Filipinos die from the flu each year. Most deaths occur in the very young and the very old age group. Read the study here:
https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0234715.